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information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles to work, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> rachel cox, who was robbie cox? >> robbie cox is my deceased uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he we
fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcolm kerr. >> was he targeted? >> because he was an american. not only american, but very visible presence in the middle east. there is no more high-profile example of america's involvement in the region in the presence of uav. >> this american university put in beirut on purpose? back in 1850s, what was beirut like? >>
places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the s
. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to try to rebuild the country, to work with u.s. agency for international development. she thought she would be o
gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight e
a good grade to score well on the standardized exams they tried this in new york city, washington, d.c. and chicago. in dallas they tried offering second graders to dollars for each book they read it's a promising idea that people are not very happy about it but let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion to the if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many things it is a good idea worth trying and how many of you would object in principle? let's see first how many of you would object? how many of you would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think that it's worth trying? all right we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those that object. who was willing to explain to offer your reason why do you think this would be objectionable in principle? and who will start us off? yes, stand up and we will get you a microphone. >> go ahead. >> i would object because there is a basic value in learning and a basic excitement about learning new things if you start paying for
there are no president cities -- protestants. there are representatives from the new york city burrows, one from queens, ruth ginsburg from -- tragically staten island is unrepresented. so those are some facts about the supreme court which i home are interesting. here's a fact about the supreme court that's important. there are five republicans and four democrats. the supreme court to me, anyway, is most important as a political institution that renders largely political judgments about the issues that come before it. i don't say that as criticism. i often, in forums like this -- why do they have to do so much politics. can't they just decide the law? well, when they decide questions like, does the constitution protect a woman's right to abortion, does a university consider race in admission. those are as much political decisions as legal issues, and i am most concerned about the cower as a ideological and political institution and that's reflected through the personalities of the justices, but mostly it's reflected through their ideology, and i am obviously very interested in the justices as people, b
and there are no protestants on the supreme court. there are representatives of the four new york city boroughs on the supreme court from the bronx ginsburg and elena kagan is from manhattan. they are on the supreme court so anyway those are some facts about the supreme court that i hope are interesting. care is a fact of the supreme court that it's important. there are five republicans and four democrats. the supreme court to me any way is most important as a political institution that render is largely political judgments about the issues that come before it. i don't say that as criticism. i often in forums like this just why do they have to do so much politics? can't they just decided the law clerks when they decide questions like does the constitution protect a woman's right to an abortion? does the university consider race in admissions? those are as much political issues as they are legal issues and if i am most concerned about the court as an ideological and political institutions and that is reflected through the personalities of the justices, but mostly it's reflected through their ideology, and i am
thousands people then as a city. 12,000 were black. the majority of the people in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12,000 people, slightly more than half were free. >> what led to washington, d.c.'s first race riots in 1835? what part did francis scott key play? jefferson recounts this almost forgotten chapter in history in "snowstorm in august" on c-span2's booktv.org. >> we don't know whether franklin roosevelt heard about forest greenberg's unprecedented call for health care as a right because even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose that time to go on vacation. frksz dr was actually on a cruise. it was probably a well-deserved vacation. three years earlier, he refused to include medical coverage because he didn't want to antagonize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the health department corchtion, but not long afterwards, the outbreak of world war ii forced the president's attention elsewhere. fives year later, january 11, 1944 in the state of the union address, roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war, and especi
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9